A Bank Robs A Man . . . .

A Man Robs A Bank

A man robs a bank and runs away. Fearful of being caught, he hides his loot in a flowerpot. After several days he’s still too afraid to retrieve his loot so he goes to a friend and tells him about the bank robbery and where he hid the loot. He asks his friend to recover the stolen money from the flowerpot, and, in return, offers his friend a share.

In this scenario, is not the bank robbers’ friend a party to the crime of bank robbery? Is not the bank robbers’ friend receiving stolen goods? Is not the bank robber’s friend receiving ill-gotten gain?

A Bank Robs A Man

 An unscrupulous banker makes a fraudulent claim of indebtedness against a customer. The customer denies the claim as false and refuses to pay. The unscrupulous banker asks a friend to collect the fraudulent debt and promises a share.

If the friend collects the debt, is he not also a party to the fraud? In this scenario, is not the friend receiving fraudulently stolen goods? Is not the friend receiving ill-gotten gain?

If the unscrupulous banker sells the fraudulent claim of debt to third-party who is unaware of the fraud and that party successfully collects the fraudulent debt, is not the customer still the victim of fraud?

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About The Twentieth Man

Age 67
This entry was posted in Churning Lawyers, Credit Cards, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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