ADULTERY

I said something very ADULT this morning.

Brother: “You want to change that thing (callus remover patch) on [the bottom of] my foot?”

Me: “I’d be happy to, you know that.”

Adultery – they could have explained it a lot better and in much greater detail in our catechism. It goes far beyond perfidy (sexual infidelity) against your spouse. Adultery is subtlety beyond the ken of children. It’s not just sarcasm or irony or inflection (inflexion) or a host of other types of linguistic subterfuge. Adultery goes beyond the barkeep watering his whisky or the butcher adding sawdust to his sausage and weighing his thumb along with it. Adultery is saying and doing things with an ulterior motive. While children are literalists and can readily grasp the denotations of words, the more subtle connotations fly right over their heads. We are, too often, adulterous in our everyday speech.

We could have also used some help in understanding covetousness, too. To covet something goes beyond envy or simply yearning to have something someone else has; but to plot and plan how to extract it from their possession. It is the intent formed before the theft.

Bearing in mind that most copies of The Biblical Ten Commandments are in fact, abridged and originally pertained specifically to the god of the Jews and his people; Moses said: “Honor thy father and thy mother.” But what if your daddy’s a junkie and jailbird and your momma’s a whore? Then what? At some point in the process of growing up we must all make an honest assessment of our own parents. In so doing, we must uphold and honor the ideals rather than trashing parenting as an institution.

Arguably there are only NINE COMMANDMENTS if parsed by topic, viz.:

                                     Exodus 20: vv1-17

1
And God spake all these words, saying,
2
I am the LORD thy God, which have brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage.
……………………………………………………………………………………………………….
The FIRST Commandment) (vv 3-6)
3
Thou shalt have no other gods before me.
4
Thou shalt not make unto thee any graven image, or any likeness of any thing that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth:
5
Thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor serve them: for I the LORD thy God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me;
6
And shewing mercy unto thousands of them that love me, and keep my commandments.
……………………………………………………………………………………………………….
The SECOND Commandment) (v 7)
Thou shalt not take the name of the LORD thy God in vain; for the LORD will not hold him guiltless that taketh his name in vain.
……………………………………………………………………………………………………….
The THIRD Commandment) (vv 8-11)
Remember the sabbath day, to keep it holy.
9
Six days shalt thou labour, and do all thy work:
10
But the seventh day is the sabbath of the LORD thy God: in it thou shalt not do any work, thou, nor thy son, nor thy daughter, thy manservant, nor thy maidservant, nor thy cattle, nor thy stranger that is within thy gates:
11
For in six days the LORD made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that in them is, and rested the seventh day: wherefore the LORD blessed the sabbath day, and hallowed it.
……………………………………………………………………………………………………….
The FOURTH Commandment) (v 12)
Honour thy father and thy mother: that thy days may be long upon the land which the LORD thy God giveth thee.
……………………………………………………………………………………………………….
The FIFTH Commandment) (v 13)
Thou shalt not kill.
……………………………………………………………………………………………………….
The SIXTH Commandment) (v 14)
Thou shalt not commit adultery.
……………………………………………………………………………………………………….
The SEVENTH Commandment) (v 15)
Thou shalt not steal.
……………………………………………………………………………………………………….
The EIGHTH Commandment) (v 16)
Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbour.
……………………………………………………………………………………………………….
The NINTH Commandment) (v 17)
Thou shalt not covet thy neighbour’s house, thou shalt not covet thy neighbour’s wife, nor his manservant, nor his maidservant, nor his ox, nor his ass, nor any thing that is thy neighbour’s.

……………………………………………………………………………………………………….
In any attempt to elucidate these commandments one finds a great overlapping of themes to the point where they all point to the same basic crime: First to covet; then to commit verbal adultery; even bear false witness; and steal thereby; and perhaps these sins ultimately result in the actual death of your neighbor. What happens to the other players (in reality) when you WIN at MONOPOLY?

My college English instructor refused to even discuss the Holy Bible despite my position that the so-called Holy Bible was just another book. It is a poorly written, selectively censored, and badly organized anthology spanning some 5,500 years. It’s been poorly transcribed, translated, edited, interpreted, reinterpreted, argued over, fought over and killed over. Most, if not the whole of it, was written before punctuation was even invented; and Chapter and Verse came even later.

It’s only natural (instinctive) that you fear death. It’s also only natural that you eventually have an epiphany and come to the realization that Death pertains to you personally; and the only one, the ONLY ONE, who can spare you is God.

So we approach God with great fear and trembling, but need we take the same approach to the words written by the hand of man about God? I think not.

To some, perhaps far too many, The American Declaration of Independence and The Constitution of the United States are held as sacrosanct Holy Writ; and any questions or doubts about them are considered blasphemy, or even treason.

As for the SECOND Commandment (Thou shalt not take the name of the LORD thy God in vain) Moses appears to have been skating on very thin ice, dependant upon your interpretation of it. After all, what does it truly mean? Speaking as God or speaking on God’s behalf? Clearly, it’s neither cursing nor swearing.

It was very late in his life that Moses finally realized that he’d never see the so-called Promised Land. The very concept is illogical and contrary to reality. Even if Moses had arrived at what he thought was the Promised Land; we are but sojourners here; and God got Moses by the scruff of the neck and removed him; thus breaking the Promise. Who was it, then, that made this literary faux pas? To whom then, was the Promise made? By whom was the Promise made? Some anonymous Hebrew scribe?

Moses realized he’d never see the Promised Land; but Martin Luthor King Jr. claims to have seen it from his mountaintop view, yet doubted he’d get there himself.

Historically, the ancient Judean and Israelite tribes never actually occupied the full extent of the Promised Land as described in their own bible. The Promise broken. And in modern times, the Jews take up arms (because their god is too weak to keep his promises and they are too impatient to wait on him) to establish; in a fit of self-fulfilling prophecy; the modern state of Israel (1948); proclaiming to all the world:

“This land is mine. God gave this land to me.”

Reality cannot be changed. It can only be relabeled so as to render it a bit more palatable.

In the perusal of the KJV Bible (read cover-to-cover) the author discovered there is no mention of himeslf. That is, I’m not mentioned in it; not even once. Because of this I work on the assumption that this book is about someone else’s god and not my own. There is no mention of me in it. Point of fact: There is no mention of me, my family, or my progenitors at all. There is no mention of the United States of America; nor is there any mention of America, North or South; the Western Hemisphere, China; and most of the rest of the world. The Hebrew Bible is really quite parochial. It is about a local, tribal god who seems to live on a specific mountaintop; caring as he does, about a specific group of people.

U.S. coins and currency are emblazoned with the motto:

“In God We Trust.”

Whose god does it refer to? Yours, mine, or ours?

About The Twentieth Man

Age 69
This entry was posted in Capitalism, Expository Writing, Personal History, Plain English, Religion, Violence. Bookmark the permalink.

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